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20100909
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the next afghanistan, a failed state. we have also seen an increased response from the u.s. government, which has made counter-terrorism one of the pits of its engagement with yemen and one of the central elements of its overall policy with yemen more broadly. whether counter-terrorism should be the pivot of u.s. policy in yemen and if it is, what kind of counter-terrorism policy is most appropriate? the country faces an extraordinary range of challenges and where by all accounts -- by many accounts, the number of al qaeda in the country remained relatively low art very important questions for u.s. policy-makers. the reason why the yemen working group at the u.s. institute of peace, which i direct, decided to focus our session this morning on the question of counter-terrorism in u.s. policy in yemen and as a component of u.s. policy more broadly toward yemen. i can literally think of no one more qualified to address the subject of counter-terrorism in yemen that our speaker today, ambassador daniel benjamin, the state department's coordinator for counter-terrorism. counter-terrorism is
: delong.typepad.com. host: thank you for getting up early and joining us on "washington journal." guest: you're welcome. and now i get to see the sunrise! host: in about an hour, the democratic governors association will be having a discussion on 1994 versus 2010, and gubernatorial opportunities for democrats. that is in about an hour or so. we will see you tomorrow morning on this program. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> and to reiterate, the democratic governors' association is meeting today and state executives will hear a panel discussion focusing on the 2010 midterm elections. there will be a democratic strategist. that will start at 11:00 a.m. eastern live here on c-span. a little bit later today, it is the defense department briefing. reporters' questions will be answered at 1:00 p.m. eastern and that will be live on c-span. in the meantime, the president of the john birch society will speak today. john mcmanus will address the unite in action group. that is on c-span 2 at 11:00. >> at long last
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
of medical technology changes over that period of time. you have diseases like pneumonia that used to kill people and now you take a few pills. we have had all these changes and that has not changed the fact that health care -- when we are wealthier, we want to consume more health care. we want to stay healthier. we're willing to pay for it and replace body parts. when you get old, you are replacing these body parts. we have not been able to control that because no one is paying for it. if individuals were paying for it, it might look different. with 60 years of consistent growth, i think we are projecting that time and saying magic will not happen in the next 60 years. we would say the variances small parade you are absolutely right that we do not know what will happen in the future. i think it is largely about incentives. if we are structuring the incentives, we are not making the providers -- we need to take medicare advantage and give people premium support and make medicare all medicare advantage and go out and let them bid to get the customers instead of us telling them what we will
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5